Posts Tagged ‘horror’

I know, I know, you see what I did there. I’m so funny, how do they even let me out of the house?
I’ve been a neglectful blogger again, and this is going to be short, but at least there’s a glimmer from me, yes? And I had to shuffle my corpse around a bit on Halloween. (more…)

I just learned this morning that Jess (Jesús) Franco has passed away. I’m going to try to put together a few thoughts about the man and his films in the days ahead. In the meantime, I’m making available a PDF of a piece I did on his film Vampyros Lesbos. This originally appeared in the Horror issue of Paradoxa (no. 17, 2002), edited by Steffen Hantke. My thanks to publisher David Willingham for granting the permission so quickly. Read the article here: Guerilla Vamping.

The current issue of Fangoria has its ballot for the 2013 Chainsaw Awards, and the nominees for “Best Wide-Release Film” got me thinking about the current state of the horror film. Here are the nominees:

-          The Cabin in the Woods

-          The Grey

-          ParaNorman

-          Sinister

-          The Woman in Black (more…)

Today, I have another guest blog. I’m over at SF Signal, talking about horror as a literary virus: http://www.sfsignal.com/archives/2012/11/guest-post-david-annandale-on-why-the-messiness-of-genres-is-a-good-thing/

Yes, I’ve written a new post. But you don’t get to read it here. Abhinav Jain has kindly invited me to contribute to his “Names: A New Perspective” series, and you can read my two-bits on names and world-building at his site, over here: http://sonsofcorax.wordpress.com/2012/11/12/nanp-the-depths-of-names/

Oh, I’ve been a bad blogger, letting weeks go by and the prose go stale here. I have, however, been doing some guest posts, so here’s a round-up of recent contributions.

On Civilian Reader’s blog, I took part in his series on “My Favourite Novel”: http://civilian-reader.blogspot.ca/2012/10/guest-post-my-favourite-novel-by-david.html

Bookworm Blues has had another series, this one on avoiding writer’s block, and here’s my bit: http://www.bookwormblues.net/2012/10/04/thoughts-on-writers-block-david-annandale/

And just today, for Halloween, I’m part of the Mind Meld at SF Signal on the relationship between the Gothic and Urban Fantasy: http://www.sfsignal.com/archives/2012/10/mind-meld-the-intersection-between-gothic-horror-and-urban-fantasy/

And now I have to get back to work on this here novel thing.

I have always loved horror.

This statement is both true and false. When I was very young, I didn’t necessarily like frightening entertainment. I think I was about four when I first encountered skeletons in a funhouse. They were just glow-in-the-dark, orange drawings on a wall, but that was enough to have me squeezing my eyes shut in mortal fear, and clutching my father’s hand for dear life until we were free of that horrible place. I did NOT like that AT ALL. (But now I treasure the memory.) I wasn’t much older when I found one of my mother’s old fairy-tale books in the basement. It had illustrations by Arthur Rackham. I slammed the book shut at the first decapitated giant. I did NOT like that AT ALL. (But now I wish I knew where that book was.) (more…)

Gyro Park

Posted: June 20, 2012 in Uncategorized
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[This is a (very) short horror story I wrote some years ago. I'm posting it now for International Short Story Day.]

Imagine the city. And now a small park: a block in area, green space, trees on the perimeter, hockey rink, playground. Monkey bars, swings, slide. Carousel. Got it? Good. Now listen. There was a grad student. Owen Astor. He was auditing an evening class. When he walked home, it was natural for him to use Gyro Park as a shortcut. But he walked home at night, and the neighbourhood was a bit sketchy, and he wasn’t a big guy. So he always gave the park a quick scan before actually setting foot in it. Sensible. Smart.

Usually there was no problem. Plenty of events at the rink, with people around. But then October came, and everything died. (more…)

Alien is my favourite movie.

I don’t know if I could tell you my favourite novel, song, video game or play. But I have no trouble pointing to one movie and saying, “There. That one. That’s my favourite.” As I suspect is the case with most people who have a definite fave, how and when I saw the film play a significant role in shaping its importance for me. My father took me to see it on my 13th birthday. Once the face-hugger popped out of the egg, and especially once Kane had that bout of indigestion, I was curled into foetal position for the rest of the picture. It was an experience of terror that I have treasured ever since. My love for the film has never abated. Over thirty years on, I appreciate the film’s accomplishments in a new, but no less fond, light. Earlier this spring, for example, as I was teaching a course on remakes and sequels, Aliens was one of the films we looked at. And much as I love Cameron’s film, too, I was struck by how some of its special effects are showing their age, while those in Alien remain almost seamless. (more…)

So. Cabin in the Woods and The Avengers. The last two movies I’ve seen (and I know I’m not alone in this), both of them bearing the Joss Whedon imprimatur (producer and co-writer of one, co-writer and director of the other). Even if there wasn’t anything else to look forward to this summer, even if there weren’t the looming shadows of Prometheus and The Dark Knight Rises, this would already be a pretty strong season. A few thoughts on them both below. These are not reviews. I’m assuming you’ve seen both movies, so there are spoilers ahead. If you haven’t seen them, then stop reading this and hit the theatres.

No, I’m serious. Go away. (more…)